Does British Columbia rely on the jobs created through the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline?

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This page builds on information from a Tsleil-Waututh Nation report that assesses the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline and tanker project. You can read and download the full report here.

 

British Columbia does not rely on the jobs created through the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion.

 

Permanent jobs created:

  • Kinder Morgan promises that the pipeline would create 50 permanent jobs in British Columbia, and 40 in Alberta.

 

Temporary jobs created:

  • Kinder Morgan has been unclear about how many temporary jobs would be created for construction, which would take place between 2017 and 2019 — within only 2 years.
  • According to CRED, Kinder Morgan has not stated whether they would employ British Columbians, other Canadians, or temporary foreign workers.

 

Food and agriculture businesses rely upon healthy environmental conditions for growing food.

 

Jobs lost:

  • Unifor and the Alberta Federation of Labour estimate that the lost jobs, the lost economic wealth, and the crowding out of existing jobs in other sectors (e.g. commercial fishing) that would arise from building the proposed pipeline, outweigh its economic benefits (Allan, 2016, p. 31)

 

  • According to CRED, the jobs of about 200,000 people in the Lower Mainland (in industries like real estate, tourism, hospitality, high tech, and film) rely on the health of the natural environment and Vancouver’s greenest city brand. An oil spill caused by pipeline or resulting tanker traffic, which is highly likely to happen, would put the jobs of about 200,000 people at risk.

 

 

Many industries in BC, including tourism, rely on the natural environment to be successful.

 

More statistics (from CredBC):

Jobs lost:

Real Estate and Property Development – 121,143

Tourism – 93,578

Film – 36,000

Information Communication Technology – 36,600

Clean Tech – 8,400

Digital Media – 16,000

Agriculture – 4,814

 

We have the chance to focus on a sustainable economy by the stopping the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline. Click here to learn more.

 

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What would the economic cost of an oil spill be? A 2012 study on the potential economic impact of a tanker spill on ocean-based industries in British Columbia, conducted by the Fisheries Centre of the University of British Columbia estimates that a medium-sized spill on British Columbia's north coast would cost the regional economy up to $189 million.
Is there an economic need for the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline? There is no economic need for the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline. We do not need to expand current pipeline infrastructure to export the oil we have available for export. Based on current supply and market predictions, current pipeline and rail infrastructure will suffice
Kinder Morgan Assessment Report Download Tsleil-Waututh "Assessment of the TransMountain Pipeline and Tanker Expansion Proposal" here for in-depth research as well as expert reports, atlases, and Tsleil-Waututh stories.

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