How likely is an oil spill if the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline goes ahead?

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Based on the Kinder Morgan’s past record, an oil spill is likely to happen at least once in four years, and the proposed pipeline will make oil spills more likely.

  • If the proposed pipeline is implemented, the likelihood of a spill in the Burrard Inlet over fifty years lies at 79-87% (Trans Mountain Assessment Report, p. 66)
    • Smaller spills (~160 cubic metres, or 1,000 barrels) are very likely
    • There is a 37% chance of a larger spill (~1600 cubic metres, or 10,000 barrels) over fifty years
    • There is a 29% likelihood of a worst-case spill (16,000 cubic metres, or 100,000 barrels) over fifty years
  • The proposed pipeline will increase tanker traffic seven times over, and increase the risk of spills in the vulnerable Burrard Inlet even further (Trans Mountain Assessment Report, p. 6)
  • The figures on tanker and terminal oil provided by Kinder Morgan, in its own risk assessment, are unreliable and inconsistent with scientific research (Trans Mountain Assessment Report, p. 69)

The Tsleil-Waututh Nation cannot accept the increased risks, effects, and consequences of even another small incident (Trans Mountain Assessment Report, p. 3)

 

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